Palapeli: Library transactions

October 2, 2009

Someone has already asked on this blog yesterday, and thereby pushed me to actually implement them: library transactions in Palapeli. These include import/export (copy puzzle files to and from the library), and deletion (remove puzzle files from the library). The screenshot below illustrates where you can find these actions:

Library transaction toolbar in Palapeli

Library transaction toolbar in Palapeli

Note though that knowing where these actions are won’t help you much currently. There are exactly 5 Palapeli puzzles in the world, and these are the default library. You cannot import those puzzles (because Palapeli uses puzzle identifiers, which need to be unique), and exporting/deleting puzzles from the default library is not allowed for obvious reasons (exporting default puzzles is pointless, and deleting default puzzles could damage the installation if you have write access to the install prefix).

The last missing piece in Palapeli (pun intended) is the puzzle creator, which will (like it once already was) allow you to create Palapeli puzzles from arbitrary images. I hope that I get this last piece done during the next week. This weekend, you can find me in the audience of this year’s Datenspuren (a conference on privacy and stuff, the name is German and means “data tracks”).

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9 Responses to “Palapeli: Library transactions”

  1. anon Says:

    So where can I get this delicious code?

    • Stefan Majewsky Says:

      At the top right of my blog is a link to a page with instructions on “How to obtain a current Palapeli”. This should help you to watch the development until your distribution ships packages.


  2. […] Palapeli: Library transactions « Stories of a KDE programmer majewsky.wordpress.com/2009/10/02/palapeli-library-transactions – view page – cached Someone has already asked on this blog yesterday, and thereby pushed me to actually implement them: library transactions in Palapeli. These include import/export (copy puzzle files to and from the… (Read more)Someone has already asked on this blog yesterday, and thereby pushed me to actually implement them: library transactions in Palapeli. These include import/export (copy puzzle files to and from the library), and deletion (remove puzzle files from the library). The screenshot below illustrates where you can find these actions: (Read less) — From the page […]

  3. Fri13 Says:

    Wow! You have got Palapeli (nice word you used ;)) very good shape at so short time. Need to take a look of it when you get that feature on it what allows to build own sets from normal photos.

    Just question about the palapelis feature, does it allow zoom out/in without steps?
    I might have not readed all the entries what you have written and such information might be missed by me. As well is it possible to rotate pieces?

    • Stefan Majewsky Says:

      Seamless zooming is technically possible, but there is no interface currently. I do not know if I have the time to add such a slider for zooming (like in Gwenview and Dolphin), but it’s on my todolist.

      • Fri13 Says:

        Is there functions for mouse wheel already? If not, use it to zoom.

        or then later adding shortcut like ctrl+wheel to rotate pieces. (or are they always tied to correct orientation?)

      • Stefan Majewsky Says:

        @Fri13: The mouse wheel is working (but it zooms in discrete steps). I have decided not to implement rotating pieces, because this makes everything harder than it needs to be. (Perhaps rotating becomes possible when the game becomes easier in later versions by some comfort functions which I want to add.)

  4. David Says:

    Why puzzle identifiers must be *universaly* unique? Could you not make it so that uniqueness only matters in the local installation? (as in, a new id is generated on import).

  5. Rob Collins Says:

    Hi.

    I just installed your fantastic game after hearing about it on the KDE website. Absolutely love it! I aggree with the previous comment though that there should be a setting to allow the puzzle to lay the pieces in random rotation orientations and then some easy way to rotate them as they are placed (maybe hitting enter repeatedly while moving a jigsaw piece to incrementally rotate 90 degrees?). After all, when you tip a real jigsaw out, the pieces are also in random orientation are they not?


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